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Linkara's Comic Book Recommendations
Booster Gold
BOOSTER GOLD! He protects the past to ensure your future! I would actually recommend two readings before jumping head first into this series. First is Showcase Presents Booster Gold, a black and white reprint of the original Booster Gold series from the 1980s. It's inexpensive and really shows that despite Booster wanting to make a business out of crimefighting, he ISN'T just in it for money and never was, despite what many modern writers like to have him be written as.

The current series basically continues on from the events of 52, which is another thing I highly recommend reading before jumping into this. However, the premise of the current series is basically that Booster Gold travels through time to right wrongs in the timestream.


Secret Six
Holy crap I cannot recommend this series enough. However, if one wants the full backstory, they should first pick up the series that got them together, known as "Villains United." That book was a tie-in to the event Infinite Crisis (itself a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths), but it sets up the main characters of the Secret Six. From there, there was a Secret Six miniseries "Six Degrees of Devastation" that set up some more character bits, but otherwise the main series itself is AWESOME.

It has a strong focus on the characters. What we have here are six B-list villains who have joined together because they honestly have noone else. It's often both heartwarming and sad, yet at other times disturbing. They've dealt with some of the worst, most evil people (not just supervillains - honest-to-god EVIL people) in the world and yet have still come out as likeable and making you want to read more about them. This is, simply put, one of the best damn books I've ever read.


Birds of Prey
On the other side of the villain/hero divide is Birds of Prey, also by Gail Simone. While Chuck Dixon was the first writer on the book during its first run, Gail really made it her own. The basic premise has Barbara Gordon, AKA Oracle, organizing heroes to run missions for her. Her usual agent is Black Canary, who is NOT a psychotic Irish ninja and has instead been trained by some of the best martial artists in the world.

Really you should be able to jump into any issue or trade without needing to know TOO much more, since any backstory is revealed to the readers in the dialogue. After Gail left the book a few years ago to work on Wonder Woman, Sean Mckeever took over and while it still had good elements, it just didn't quite work the same way, but it's still worth checking out if you become a fan. So yeah, either pick up the current ongoing series or check in with some of the back-issues.


Justice Society of America/JSA
Since a new creative direction is starting in the book, I can't say for certain if the ongoing is still worth it, but the back-issues of the series, particularly when it was called "JSA" are definitely worth checking out. They were the world's first superhero team and they fully embrace that legacy, bringing in new versions of old characters, legacy heroes, and just basically work together to face off against all manner of villains.

Green Lantern/Green Lantern Corps.
Several years ago, Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern, went bad - killed the entire Green Lantern Corps., then tried to remake the universe. Twice. Writer Geoff Johns made it his goal to repair that creative error and has built up a massive amount of mythos around the Green Lanterns.

While at times both series can be a little convoluted and event-crazy, both series are definitely worth checking out for a mixture of superhero action as well as space police kind of fun. Start with the trades, though - at any given time, there might be an event or the like happening and you'll be walking into it without any context as to who is what and where.


Justice League of America/JLA
The quality of the Justice League's main book tends to ebb and flow. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it's average. Personally I think it's at its best when it embraces its tagline of "The World's Greatest Superheroes," which is why if there's a place you want to start from, I'd suggest start with a trade collection of "A Midsummer's Nightmare," which in turn leads into the series "JLA" as written by Grant Morrison.

At times, Grant Morrison's work can feel like you're reading something that just skipped two pages, but this stuff is the height of epic, combining multiple storylines at once to raise the stakes for the heroes and truly make it seem like even though they're the most powerful superheroes in the world, they have a true challenge on their hands.

Batman/Superman/Wonder Woman
Because of the natures of these books with often-rotating creative teams, recommending the "Current" run of any of them will inevitably become outdated. As such, here are just some recommendations for runs I recommend you seek out:

-Batman/Detective Comics runs where Dick Grayson initially starts out as Batman. While him currently being Batman is also good, I think the initial energy of when he started is excellent, particularly under Judd Winick or Grant Morrison (though again, the warning for Grant Morrison's book stands - almost every piece of dialogue becomes important in some fashion).
-Superman: I enjoyed Kurt Busiek's run on the book, but of course with a character like Superman your mileage is always going to vary.
-Wonder Woman: I HIGHLY recommend Gail Simone's run on the book, but if you really wanted a look farther back, Greg Rucka's run is full of heart and great mythical action.

Incredible Hercules - The series spun out of Incredible Hulk and I believe it was written by Greg Pak, though don't take my word for it.
Annihilation - Space Adventure stuff - end of the Marvel universe as we know it, but focuses on Marvel's space heroes fending off the oncoming threat.
Nova - Kind of like Green Lantern, but is the follow-up to Annihilation. I really only read the first few issues, where Nova chews out Iron Man for being too busy with the Civil War crap to stop the Annihilation wave. (It has been pointed out that the ongoing series has been canceled, unfortunately)
Thor - The series written by J. Michael Straczynski. I admit I only read a few issues, but I hear the series has continued to be good even after JMS left.
Amazing Spider-Man - At least, the times when it was written by JMS. One More Day notwithstanding, the series up until that point was actually pretty damn good, with Aunt May discovering Peter's identity and changing the nature of their relationship for the better. Sure, there are some flat-out WEIRD things that happen during the run, but they're not necessarily all that bad compared to others.
Astonishing X-Men - Many have recommended Joss Whedon's run on the book as a good place to start for those looking to get into the X-Men.

JLA/Titans: The Technis Imperative
As I've said many times before, this is my favorite comic book ever. I think I've gone over this one in detail quite enough in actual video form, but in case you missed that episode or skipped it, this is my favorite comic book ever. It's a three-issue miniseries that was meant to get the ball rolling on a new Titans series and it succeeded. The basic premise: an alien force grabs hold of the moon and starts kidnapping every member of the Teen Titans that's ever been on the team.

Admittedly, this one might be difficult for new readers, however this is also the book that got me into comics books to begin with. It gives enough history within its pages that you know what's going on without needing to consult wikipedia and it makes you want to read more about the characters instead of simply being confused by them. It is also the book that I hold as the benchmark for comparison to all other "Event" comics.

This one is also difficult to find since it's out of print, but it's worth trying to find it.


Watchmen
Watchmen is another one that I often will compare other comics to, basically because it is considered by many to be the GREATEST COMIC EVER MADE. I don't necessarily agree, but at the very least it's the "Citizen Kane" of comics. As good as the movie was, it could never hope to capture the actual comic and the multitude of themes and events transpiring within it, plus it changed details here and there (not just the squid thing that I harp on a lot).

The premise is basically that in the 30s and 40s, people were inspired by superhero comics to actually try to become crimefighters themselves. By 1985, it's looked at as a forgotten fad and now one, the Comedian, has been murdered. If a local comic book shop or book store DOESN'T have a copy of Watchmen, even if they don't regularly carry graphic novels, you should wonder what the deal is with it.


V for Vendetta
Another Alan Moore story, but this one's a hell of a lit more grim and washed-out than its barely-recognizable movie adaptation (Hugo Weaving as V being the exception in that).

V for Vendetta is a story about fascism vs. anarchy, not any standard left vs. right politics. The characters are rich and complex, with interweaving plots about attempts to grab power among those already among the elite and a man's quest for revenge who could be easily interpreted as either hero or villain for his actions. This story contains a TON of memorable moments, but for me, none is better than a simple line, "Give me a Viking Funeral." Should be easy to find and does not require any previous comic knowledge.


Starman
If you've seen my "Justice League: Cry for Justice" reviews, you should be familiar with the name James Robinson. Robinson is NOT a bad writer and Starman is proof of that. Even I, someone who hates Cry for Justice with every fiber of my being, cannot bring myself to fault him for Cry for Justice that much because of this series.

Starman is the story of Jack Knight, the son of the Golden Age hero Starman. When Starman's old enemy The Mist begins a massive crime spree to destroy his nemesis and everything he olds dear, Jack must reluctantly take up the mantle of Starman to save his father and Opal City. Along the way of Jack Knight's journey as a hero, he gains allies from across the DC Universe, both heroes and villains, and his story has a definitive conclusion that to this day no one has interfered with out of respect to that character and to James Robinson himself for it.

The series is currently collected in the six Starman Omnibus books, which all should be fairly easy to find or order. While it is built HEAVILY on the mythos of the DC Universe, pretty much every character's backstory is explored and given to the readers, so any supplementary reading just enhances the experience. There are the occasional issues, though, that connect to events occurring in the greater universe at the time, like DC's "One Million" event, but again, it's nothing you NEED to know in order to get the point of the story.


Avengers: Forever
I freely admit that I'm more of a DC fan than Marvel. That isn't to say that I'm not a fan of some Marvel things, but I'm just not as into the Marvel Universe as others. However, I had read a long time ago about how Avengers: Forever was supposed to be really good, so on a whim I picked it up... and it is glorious.

The premise is that the Avengers' longtime ally, Rick Jones, has been targeted for elimination by the being known as Immortus. An alliance of other cosmic forces gathers seven members of the Avengers from across its past and future to protect him and discover the greater plot in play to destroy mankind.

Again, this one may be more difficult for newer readers, but as someone with only a passing knowledge of the Avengers, this was still incredibly fun for me. This one may also be a bit harder to find, but it's well worth it.


52
After the events of the DC event book "Infinite Crisis," the world must now continue without Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman within it. The series was released weekly for an entire year and it was glorious, told in real time to that year. What began as a way to fill in the gaps between Infinite Crisis and the DC books at the time which had "jumped ahead one year later," instead evolved into a story about minor characters in the DCU like Steel, Black Adam, Booster Gold, Renee Montoya, and more exploring various corners of the DC Universe.

There's something for everyone here - a story about a supervillain seeking redemption through the rebuilding of his home nation, a cosmic story about three lost heroes trying to find their way back to earth, one man's quest to bring his wife back to life through magic, and, again, much more.

This one should be easy to find and I'm pretty sure is still in print, but it's a story about the DC Universe as a whole, so of course there are going to be references to events transpiring within it and things that have happened before, but I think should be easy enough for newcomers, especially when reading it again and picking up on all the little things that were hinted and foreshadowed from earlier.


Sandman
There's no easy way to define this series. At its core, it's fantasy. The entity known as Dream (AKA Morpheus, AKA the Sandman) has been trapped for 70 years by a sorceror, but now he's gotten free and rebuilds his domain as the weaver and lord of dreams. Throughout the run we meet some heroes of the DC Universe both past and present, but for the most part this is a story that is all its own, since at the time the DC imprint Vertigo wasn't certain of whether it was really a part of the DC Universe or not.

It's got romance, parables, action, and even a sojourn into hell in one of my favorite issues ever, "A Hope in Hell." This one's still in print, too, and it's honestly that good, though the art style may not be to everyone's taste. It has both beauty and horror and both are given their proper exploration.


Crisis on Infinite Earths
One of the first "Event" books from a major comic company and it's also one of the best. In 1985, the DC Universe had A LOT of alternate universes and timelines. For many, it wasn't difficult to follow, but for new readers it was considered a challenge trying to figure out who was from what world. As such, it was decided to bring them to an end in one of the first "event" comics.

A massive wall of anti-matter is traveling through every parallel universe, wiping them out. What's causing it? How will the worlds survive? Starring EVERYBODY that DC owned, it's the very definition of epic, and really the point where modern DC Comics began. It's also still in print, so it shouldn't be difficult to find. It might be a little difficult for new readers since there are a lot of characters in it who are either dead or have changed over the years, but the principle characters like Batman and Superman are there and you'll have fun wanting to know about some of the other heroes highlighted in it.


Secret Wars
"I AM FROM BEYOND! SLAY YOUR ENEMIES AND ALL THAT YOU DESIRE SHALL BE YOURS! NOTHING YOU DREAM OF IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR ME TO ACCOMPLISH!"
Those are the first words of a being known as the Beyonder, who brings forth a large group of heroes and a large group of villains to duke it out on an alien world. It admittedly can be confusing at times and it's VERY action-oriented, but for an event comic it's got a lot of good character moments and it's also the origin of Spider-Man's black costume. It's got enough great twists and turns to keep you interested and just great superhero action. You don't need to know very much about Marvel history to get this one - most of the history or the like is given in-comic.


Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes, Pre-2011 reboot)
Jaime Reyes' story spun-out of the event book Infinite Crisis, wherein he was given a supposedly-mystical scarab that granted him an armored suit. In his solo series, we see him having to learn how to be a hero while exploring the legacy of the two previous Blue Beetles, paying tribute to those characters. Many people didn't give Jaime a fair shot while he was Blue Beetle, but you can still find the trade paperback of the series, which for a while was my absolute favorite book on the market.

My update here is that I gave the first five issues of the 2011 reboot Blue Beetle a shot and, well, I hated them. I felt that everything that made the book so beloved in my eyes (Jaime's open identity with his family and friends, the strong friendship and camraderie not only with said family and friends but with the scarab, the sense of fun and adventure into a world he had never dreamed of being in, the legacy of the Blue Beetle) had been lost, emphasizing action, violence, and a complete misunderstanding of the original book, instead telling a clichéd story of a reluctant hero battling with the armor possessing him. If you're going to pick up a Blue Beetle series, go with the trades that started with "Shellshocked."


Trinity
After the abysmal Countdown, it would've been very easy for the third weekly series from DC to be even worse, but thankfully it wasn't. Taking a cue from 52, the series is self-contained. Instead of a world without Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, this series asks what if ALL THREE of the them were taken out of the world's entire history and creates new heroes and resurrects several formerly dead ones. While at times the artwork isn't anything spectacular, it's a great story in my humble opinion and definitely worth checking out, though it does continue some elements from the next recommendation.


JLA/Avengers
Krona, a powerful scientist seeking to understand the origins of the universe, makes a bet with the Marvel villain called the Grandmaster. Both pit each universe's respective super-team on a scavenger hunt for some of the most powerful items in their universes. The two teams must learn to respect the other and eventually join forces to save all universes from Krona. This one can be confusing for people new to comics, but it was a load of fun for me, especially the ending confrontation when members of both teams' history keep appearing and disappearing to help. Simply put, it's flippin' awesome. Besides, where else will you see Superman wielding Captain America's shield?


Booster Gold
BOOSTER GOLD! He protects the past to ensure your future! I would actually recommend two readings before jumping head first into this series. First is Showcase Presents Booster Gold, a black and white reprint of the original Booster Gold series from the 1980s. It's inexpensive and really shows that despite Booster wanting to make a business out of crimefighting, he ISN'T just in it for money and never was, despite what many modern writers like to have him be written as.

His other series continued on from the events of 52, which is another thing I highly recommend reading before jumping into this (but isn't necessary). However, the premise of that series was basically that Booster Gold traveled through time to right wrongs in the timestream, visiting past events of the DC Universe and stopping people from altering events.


Secret Six
Holy crap I cannot recommend this series enough. However, if one wants the full backstory, they should first pick up the series that got them together, known as "Villains United." That book was a tie-in to the event Infinite Crisis (itself a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths), but it sets up the main characters of the Secret Six. From there, there was a Secret Six miniseries "Six Degrees of Devastation" that set up some more character bits, but otherwise the main series itself is AWESOME.

It has a strong focus on the characters. What we have here are six B-list villains who have joined together because they honestly have noone else. It's often both heartwarming and sad, yet at other times disturbing. They've dealt with some of the worst, most evil people (not just supervillains - honest-to-god EVIL people) in the world and yet have still come out as likeable and making you want to read more about them. This is, simply put, one of the best damn books I've ever read. While the series had to end in a rather rushed fashion because of the 2011 reboot, it still had an ending that felt like it reflected the themes of the book perfectly.


Birds of Prey
On the other side of the villain/hero divide is Birds of Prey, also by Gail Simone. While Chuck Dixon was the first writer on the book during its first run, Gail really made it her own. The basic premise has Barbara Gordon, AKA Oracle, organizing heroes to run missions for her. Her usual agent is Black Canary, who is NOT a psychotic Irish ninja and has instead been trained by some of the best martial artists in the world.

Really you should be able to jump into any issue or trade without needing to know TOO much more, since any backstory is revealed to the readers in the dialogue. After Gail left the book a few years ago to work on Wonder Woman, Sean Mckeever took over and while it still had good elements, it just didn't quite work the same way, but it's still worth checking out if you become a fan. The 2011 reboot series was just BLEH in my mind, but I've heard good things about it.


Justice Society of America/JSA
I want to particularly emphasize the run by James Robinson, David Goyer, and Geoff Johns. The book spun out of events happening in JLA that showed that the original Golden Age characters (and those who inherited their legacy) still had plenty going for them in modern times, creating a VERY enjoyable book that explains all of its backstory when needed while still possessing a diverse amount of characters rooted in so many different origins. All the trades are worth checking out, as well as the follow-up Justice Society of America book that came following Infinite Crisis.


Earth-2
Speaking of the Justice Society, at the time of this post, they are not a part of the rebooted DCU. However, they instead got their own world to play in - a world that has been through a devastating war with Darkseid, but are now coming into modern times with new heroes emerging and slowly forming a new team. I'm currently enjoying it, but time will tell if this one will stand the test of time.


World's Finest
Aaaand spun off from the Earth-2 concept, the daughter of Batman (the Huntress) and the Supergirl of Earth-2 (Power Girl) have found themselves stranded in the rebooted DCU, trying to find a way home. I know many people have objections with the book, mostly relating to Power Girl and her costume and personality, but personally I haven't ha dany big objections to them. Is her personality different? Yes, but not in a way that I have found frustrating as of yet. Plus I actually liked her costume (they fixed some of the issues I had with it from the preliminary pictures of it), but I hear she's getting the classic boob hole costume again, so whatever.


Deadpool
Like so much else, there is no single place to start looking at the Merc with a Mouth. I would strongly advise looking for trades of Cable and Deadpool, where the two Liefeld creations work awesomely together with Cable the straight man and Deadpool being jokey and breaking the fourth wall. Deadpool's current solo series is an hilarious read and I'd recommend starting there with his tie-in issues to the event Secret Invasion. Deadpool Team-Up has him joining forces with a ton of Marvel heroes, even our old pal US-1 (now called US-Ace).
Deadpool's current solo series is an hilarious read and the previous one was awesome, as well.


Green Lantern/Green Lantern Corps.
Several years ago, Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern, went bad - killed the entire Green Lantern Corps., then tried to remake the universe. Twice. Writer Geoff Johns made it his goal to repair that creative error and has built up a massive amount of mythos around the Green Lanterns.

While at times both series can be a little convoluted and event-crazy, both series are definitely worth checking out for a mixture of superhero action as well as space police kind of fun. Start with the trades, though - at any given time, there might be an event or the like happening and you'll be walking into it without any context as to who is what and where. This book is also one of the least affected by the 2011 reboot, so you have plenty of ground you can cover without worrying too much.


Justice League of America/JLA
The quality of the Justice League's main book tends to ebb and flow. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it's average. Personally I think it's at its best when it embraces its tagline of "The World's Greatest Superheroes," which is why if there's a place you want to start from, I'd suggest start with a trade collection of "A Midsummer's Nightmare," which in turn leads into the series "JLA" as written by Grant Morrison.

At times, Grant Morrison's work can feel like you're reading something that just skipped two pages, but this stuff is the height of epic, combining multiple storylines at once to raise the stakes for the heroes and truly make it seem like even though they're the most powerful superheroes in the world, they have a true challenge on their hands. I have not enjoyed the current verison of it at all.

Power Girl
Power Girl is Superman's cousin from a parallel universe. There, done, that's her origin story in a nutshell. She doesn't take crap from anyone and her series is a lot of fun. The initial run of the book is probably at its best, with fun artwork from Amanda Conner and just awesome writing. The current series by Judd Winick is still good and has some superb artwork from Sami Basri. While it's not as good as the initial run, it's still a good book and worth checking out.

Batman/Superman/Wonder Woman
Because of the natures of these books with often-rotating creative teams, recommending the "Current" run of any of them will inevitably become outdated. As such, here are just some recommendations for runs I recommend you seek out:

-Batman/Detective Comics runs where Dick Grayson initially starts out as Batman. While him currently being Batman is also good, I think the initial energy of when he started is excellent, particularly under Judd Winick or Grant Morrison (though again, the warning for Grant Morrison's book stands - almost every piece of dialogue becomes important in some fashion). Another recommendation there would be anything by Scott Snyder. While his "Death of the Family" arc wasn't as good, IMHO, it was still fairly enjoyable for the most part.
-Superman: I enjoyed Kurt Busiek's run on the book, but of course with a character like Superman your mileage is always going to vary.
-Wonder Woman: I HIGHLY recommend Gail Simone's run on the book, but if you really wanted a look farther back, Greg Rucka's run is full of heart and great mythical action.

Red Robin
While I'm not fond of either the name or the costume, Tim Drake (AKA the third Robin)'s run as the solo hero has been very good, starting with his search for the then-dead Bruce Wayne (though he is annoyingly mopey in the early stuff of the current book), it's followed by a great storyline which pits him against Ra's Al'Ghul and the book is currently written by Fabien Nicieza, who many of you may recall I've felt bad about making fun of in my reviews because he's a good writer. And unlike books like Cable: Blood and Metal, these books don't have hideous artwork or ludicrously boring stories.

Teen Titans
The Titans have had a looong history. If you wanted to start in the past, I'd recommend looking into the run written by Marv Wolfman in the 1980s, considered the very best of the book. Beyond that, Devin Grayson's run on the book, with the team as adults helping teach some of the old guard, is my personal favorite run. The current series written by J.T. Krul has been good so far, but it's only been about three or four issues so far. Geoff Johns' run has been liked by many (and is the start of where the current volume of the book began), but for me it was very hit and miss in some of its aspects, but still recommended. I felt it was really starting to get good again with J.T. Krul's run that ended at issue 100 due to the 2011 reboot. The current ongoing is... bleh.


Darkwing Duck
For those of you who enjoyed the original cartoon, this one picked up a few years later after the series and manages to tell just awesome superhero stories while building on the continuity of the show and having an ongoing storyline. It's exciting, humorous, AND dramatic. Just awesome, but sadly ended some time ago, but still worth picking up in trade.


Batgirl
I fear many fans of Cassandra Cain, the previous Batgirl, haven't taken a look at this series because of perceived disservice to that character. As a fan of Cass, I sympathize and agree she has been given the short stick as of late, but Stephanie Brown's run as Batgirl has been very enjoyable, IMHO. Steph takes the role seriously and her own mythos and supporting cast have been built up over the last year to great effect.

While I still object to Barbara Gordon being back in the Batgirl suit after the spectacular work done with Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown in the role, Gail Simone was the only person that could be trusted to make Barbara as Batgirl work again and the book has been phenmonenal, despite a few shakey early issues.


Kingdom Come
An Elseworlds tale set in the future of the DC Universe. Superman retired after it became clear that the people embraced more violent, aggressive, and murderous anti-heroes. However, some years later a group of heroes causes a disaster in Kansas that forces Superman to come back and make things right. However, will he actually help or only make things worse?


Squadron Supreme
While Watchmen is heralded as one of the pioneer works of making superheroes more "adult," Squadron Supreme dealt with more adult issues a year earlier. Basically the Squadron are pastiches of DC characters, but made by Marvel for a story in their books. During a time back in their own world, they attempt to create a utopia by seizing control of the world, forcibly rehabilitating criminals, and ending the world's problems. It seems pretty cut and dry described like that to make them the villains, but honestly the book is about them trying to come to terms with the ideas they're presenting and their slow realization that they have become a totalitarian state. Highly recommended.


Demon Knights
This is one that's currently ongoing in the DC Reboot (or, if it's cancelled by the time you read this, pick it up in trade). A sword-and-sorcery fantasy tale that's set in the medieval times of the DC Universe. Several heroes and villains who existed around that time find themselves united to face off against various threats. It's highly quotable and has great characterization and art.


Shazam and the Monster Society of Evil
A retelling of Captain Marvel's origins as done by Jeff Smith of Bone fame (Bone in the "I have not read" section below). Young Billy Batson gains the power to become a powerful adult known as Captain Marvel to stop an evil being called Mr. Mind. Very fun, highly recommended, and a good book for kids.


Rapunzel's Revenge
Speaking of books for kids, this one's great. The story is a reinterpretation of Rapunzel, wherein she escapes from the tower herself and uses her hair as lassos against the various people after her while also seeking to topple the regime of the evil Queen who pretended to be her mother for so many years.

Captain America - The series as written by Ed Brubaker, which introduced the concept of the Winter Soldier, which fans of the Captain America movie may want to read in preparation for the sequel.

Incredible Hercules - The series spun out of Incredible Hulk and I believe it was written by Greg Pak, though don't take my word for it.

Annihilation - Space Adventure stuff - end of the Marvel universe as we know it, but focuses on Marvel's space heroes fending off the oncoming threat.

Nova - Kind of like Green Lantern, but is the follow-up to Annihilation. I really only read the first few issues, where Nova chews out Iron Man for being too busy with the Civil War crap to stop the Annihilation wave. (It has been pointed out that the ongoing series has been canceled, unfortunately)

Thor - The series written by J. Michael Straczynski. I admit I only read a few issues, but I hear the series has continued to be good even after JMS left.

Amazing Spider-Man - At least, the times when it was written by JMS. One More Day notwithstanding, the series up until that point was actually pretty damn good, with Aunt May discovering Peter's identity and changing the nature of their relationship for the better. Sure, there are some flat-out WEIRD things that happen during the run, but they're not necessarily all that bad compared to others.

Astonishing X-Men - Many have recommended Joss Whedon's run on the book as a good place to start for those looking to get into the X-Men.

Y: The Last Man - A science fiction story set in a future where a disease has killed off all men except one, a man named Yorick. I've only read snippets, but it's very enjoyable and very smartly written, with naturally lots and lots of earth's remaining population reacting differently to how this kind of catastrophe would affect the world.

The Walking Dead - If you've seen the TV series or at least the Longbox of the Damned episode that talks about the first volume, you should know that it's a pretty smartly-written zombie apocalypse story about a group of survivors as they travel across the land seeking shelter from the walking dead.

Fables - A fantasy series by Bill Willingham with, like, a bajillion volumes and still ongoing, if I recall correctly. The basic starting point is that the fairy tale world still exists and all those characters are still in modern times, having to deal with the various magical politics between them.

Bone - I honestly know nothing about Bone, but I have the first trade and I've heard it's really, REALLY damn good. I also hear it's child-friendly, so there's that.
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 169-183 June, 1968
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 111-149 August, 1972
Marvel Premiere Vol. 1 Issues 9-14 July, 1973
Doctor Strange Vol. 2 Issues 1-18 June, 1974
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 153 February, 1976
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 27-30 February, 1978
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 32-33 December, 1978
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 25-31 December, 1978
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 35-37 June, 1979
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 182-199 July, 1979

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 13 December, 1979

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 200-205 January, 1980

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 43 June, 1980

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 206 July, 1980

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 45-52 August, 1980

The Avengers Issue 200 October, 1980
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 46-62 April, 1981
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 54-58 May, 1981

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 3 September, 1981

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 59-61

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 224-227 January, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 229-231 June, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 16 August 31, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 232-244 September, 1982

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 78-79 May, 1983

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 17 September 6, 1983

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 245-252 October, 1983

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 85 December, 1983
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 65-73 June, 1984
Superman Annual Vol. 1 Issue 11 November, 1984
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 267 August, 1985
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 107-110 October, 1985

Nova Girls: Kissing Canvas 1985
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issue 75 February, 1986
The Dark Knight Returns February 1986
The Man of Steel (Comic Book) July 10, 1986
Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? September, 1986
The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 21 June 9, 1987

Action Comics Issue 592 September, 1987

Action Comics Issue 593 October, 1987
Kraven's Last Hunt 31 October, 1987

Hellblazer January 1988

Tank Girl October 1988
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 1-43 November, 1988
Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom: Triumph and Torment July, 1989

The Infinity Gauntlet July, 1991
The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 178-203 July, 1991
Maus 1991
Youngblood (Comic Book) April 1992
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 2 July, 1992
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 44-54
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 368-370 November, 1992
The Maxx March 1993

Raver (Comic Book) April, 1993
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 3 June, 1993
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 55-67 June, 1993
Spider-Man Vol.1 Issues 37-40 August, 1993
The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 13 September, 1993
The Secret Defenders Issue 9 November, 1993

The Secret Defenders Issue 10 December, 1993

Future Shock (1993 Comic Book) 1993

Marvels(1994 Comic Book) January, 1994

Hellboy March 1994
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 389-406 May, 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 14 June, 14 1994
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 4 July, 1994
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 68-90 August, 1994
Spider-Man: Clone Saga October 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 217 October, 1994
Bimbos in Time (Comic Book) 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 223 April, 1995
Astro City August, 1995
Spider-Man: The Lost Years Vol.1 Issues 1-4 August, 1995
Untold Tales of Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 1-26 September, 1995
Preacher (Comic Book) 1995

Superman: At Earth's End 1995

Warrior (1996 Comic Book) January 1, 1996

Spider-Man Team-Up Vol. 1 Issue 2 March, 1996

StormWatch Vol. 1 Issues 37-50 July, 1996
Spider-Man: Redemption Vol. 1 September, 1996
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 241-257 December, 1996
Santa the Barbarian 1996

Spider-Man: Hobgoblin Lives Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 January, 1997

Spider-Man: Dead Man's Hand Vol. 1 Issue 1 April, 1997
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue -1 July, 1997
StormWatch Vol. 2 Issues 0-11 September, 1997

Untold Tales of Spider-Man Strange Encounter Vol. 1 Issue 1 June, 1998
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 259-261 July, 1998

The Authority Vol. 1 Issues 1-12 May 1, 1999

Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. Vol. 1 Issues 0-14 July 1, 1999

Catwoman: Guardian of Gotham August, 1999

The Authority Vol. 1 Issues 13-29 May 1, 2000

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 164-175 September 1, 2000

Spider-Man: Revenge of the Green Goblin Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 October, 2000

Ultimate Spider-Man October, 2000

What's So Funny About Truth, Justice & the American Way? March, 2001

The Flash: Iron Heights August 1, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 176-177 September, 2001

The Flash: Our Worlds at War Vol. 1 Issue 1 October, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issue 178 November, 2001

The Flash Secret Files and Origins Vol. 1 Issue 3 November, 2001

Daredevil Vol. 2 Issues 26-81 December, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 179-185 December, 2001

Catwoman Vol. 3 Issue 1-37 January, 2002

DC First: Flash/Superman Vol. 1 Issue 1 July, 2002

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 186-225 July, 2002
Spider-Man: Blue July 1, 2002

Fantastic Four Vol. 3 Issues 60-70 October, 2002

Marville (Comic Book) November, 2002

Gotham Central Vol. 1 Issues 1-40 December, 2002

Invincible (Comic Book) Issues 1-144 January 22, 2003

Persepolis (Comic Book) April 1, 2003
Superman: Red Son June 1, 2003
Runaways Vol. 1 Issues 1-18 July, 2003

Fantastic Four Vol. 1 Issues 500-524 September, 2003

Spider-Man/Doctor Octopus: Negative Exposure Issues 1-5 December 1, 2003
Superman: Secret Identity January 1, 2004
Marvel Knights: Spider-Man Vol. Issues 1-12 June, 2004
Ex Machina (Comic Book) Issues 1-50 August 1, 2004

Scott Pilgrim August 18, 2004

The Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 500-503 September, 2004

Madrox Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 November, 2004

Witchblade Vol. 1 Issues 80-150 November, 2004

The Avengers Vol. 1 Finale Issue 1 December 1, 2004

The New Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-15 December 29, 2004

WE3 2004

Silent Hill: Paint It Black February, 2005

Runaways Vol. 2 Issues 1-24 April, 2005

All Star Batman & Robin, the Boy Wonder July, 2005
The World's Greatest Super-Heroes July 6, 2005
All-Star Superman November, 2005

Annihilation (Comic Book) November, 2005

The Future 5 2005

Jonah Hex Vol. 2 Issue 1-70 January, 2006

X-Factor Vol. 3 Issues 1-31 January, 2006

The Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 Issues 92-111 April 2006

The New Avengers Annual Vol. 1 Issues 1-2 April 26, 2006

The New Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 16-64 April, 2006

Detective Comics Vol. 1 Issues 821-850 September, 2006

X-Men Vol. 2 Issues 188-207 September, 2006

The Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1 Issues 1-12 November 29, 2006
Doctor Strange: The Oath Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 December 1, 2006

Thunderbolts Vol. 1 Issues 110-121 January 31, 2007

The Mighty Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-20 March 7, 2007

Countdown to Final Crisis May, 2007
The Sensational Spider-Man Annual Vol.1 Issue 1 May 2, 2007

The Invincible Iron Man Vol. 1 Issues 1-33 May 8, 2007

Runaways Vol. 2 Issues 25-30 June, 2007

World War Hulk Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 June 13, 2007

Annihilation: Conquest - Starlord Vol. 1 Issues 1-4 September, 2007

Spider-Man: One More Day November, 2007

The Incredible Hercules Vol. 1 Issues 112-141 January, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist: Orson Randall and the Green Mist of Death Vol. 1 Issue 1 February 1, 2008

Locke & Key: WeLCoMe To LoVeCRaFT Issues 1-6 February 20, 2008

X-Men: Legacy Vol. 1 Issues 208-260 April, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1 Issues 13-16 May, 2008

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Issues 1-25 July, 2008

X-Factor: The Quick and the Dead July, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist: The Origin of Danny Rand Vol. 1 Issue 1 August, 2008

X-Factor Vol. 3 Issues 32-50 August, 2008

Runaways Vol. 3 Issues 1-14 October, 2008

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 34-45 October, 2008

Final Crisis: Rogues' Revenge Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 September 1, 2008

Irredeemable Issues 1-37 April 1, 2009

The Flash: Rebirth Vol. 1 Issues 1-6 April 1, 2009

Justice League: Cry for Justice July 1, 2009

Fantastic Four Vol. 1 Issues 570-611 August 26, 2009

The Incredible Hulk Vol. 1 Issues 601-611 August 26, 2009

Supergirl Annual Vol. 5 Issue 1 November, 2009

Thunderbolts Vol. 1 Issues 138-174 November 18, 2009

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 46-57 December, 2009

X-Factor Vol. 1 Issues 200-262 December 16, 2009

American Vampire March 17, 2010

The Flash: Secret Files and Origins Vol. 1 Issue 1 April 7, 2010

The Flash Vol. 3 Issues 1-12 April 14, 2010

Artifacts (Comic Book) Issues 1-32 May 1, 2010

The New Avengers Finale Vol. 1 May 12, 2010

The Avengers Vol. 4 Issues 1-20 May 19, 2010

Avengers Academy June 2010

Avengers Prime Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 June 3, 2010

Jonah Hex: No Way Back June 3, 2010

The New Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 1-15 June 16, 2010

The Invincible Iron Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 1 June 30, 2010

Thor: The Mighty Avenger Vol. 1 Issues 1-8 July 8, 2010

Uncanny X-Force Vol. 1 Issues 1-35 October, 2010

Supergirl Annual Vol. 5 Issue 2 December, 2010

Detective Comics Vol. 1 Issues 871-881 January, 2011

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 58-59 January, 2011

The Invincible Iron Man Vol. 1 Issues 500-527 January 19, 2011

FF Vol. 1 Issues 1-23 March 23, 2011

Flashpoint Vol. 2 Issues 1-5 May 11, 2011

The New Avengers Annual Vol. 2 Issue 1 September 7, 2011

The New Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 16-34 September 14, 2011

Holy Terror (Comic Book) September 28, 2011

Fear Itself Vol. 1 Issue 7.2 November 9, 2011

Fear Itself Vol. 1 Issue 7.3 November 16, 2011

The Avengers Annual Vol. 4 Issue 1 January 4, 2012

The Avengers Vol. 4 Issues 21-34 January 18, 2012

Saga (Comic Book) March 2012 

Avengers Assemble Vol. 2 Issues 1-8 March 14, 2012

The Culling: Rise of the Ravagers (Comic Book) July, 2012

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-19 October 10, 2012

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Issues 1-21 March 27, 2013

Artifacts (2010 Comic Book) Issues 33-40 December 31, 2013

Southern Bastards April 30, 2014
Uncanny Avengers Annual Vol. Issue 1 April 30, 2014

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 20-25 May 28, 2014

Avengers & X-Men: AXIS Vol. 1 Issues 1-9 October 8, 2014

Guardians of the Galaxy Annual Vol. 3 Issue 1 December 10, 2014

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Issues 22-27 December 17, 2014

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 1-5 January 28, 2015

Guardians of Knowhere Vol. 1 Issues 1-4 July 15, 2015
 ‎
The Angry Beavers
Samurai Jack
Avatar: The Last Airbender
Adventure Time
Gravity Falls
Steven Universe
Star vs. the Forces of Evil
Rick and Morty
The Venture Bros.
Archer
Bob's Burgers
The Loud House
BoJack Horseman
We Bare Bears
Over the Garden Wall
Wander Over Yonder
ThunderCats (2011 TV Show)
Sym-Bionic Titan
Young Justice (TV Show)
Robotech (kind of cheating, I know)
Macross
Galaxy Express 999
Mysterious Cities of Gold
Grimm's Fairy Tales
Future Boy Conan
Fist of the North Star (some)
Space Battleship Yamato
Voltron (some)
Speed Racer (some)
Astro-Boy (some)
Urusei Yatsura
Battle Angel Alita
Cat's Eye (some)
Sailor Moon (some)
DBZ (very few)
DearS
Onegai Sensei
Fruitsbasket
Full Metal Alchemist
Full Metal Alchemist Brotherhood
Last Exile
Last Exile Fam The Silver Wing
Bakuretsu Tenshi
Love Hina
Getbackers
Monster
Kyogoku's Hundred Ghost Stories
Lain
Helsing
Gantz
Elfen Lied
Girls Bravo
Aishiteruze Baby
Bleach (through Bontou storyline)
Naruto (first 26 episodes)
One Piece (first 26 episodes)
Gunslinger Girl 1, 2
Genshiken 1, 2, 3
Tiger and Bunny
Cowboy Bebop
Blue Gender
Trigun
Gun X Sword
Silver Spoon 1, 2
Paranoia Agent
Kino's Journey
Sword Art Online 1, 2 (in progress)
FLCL
Space Dandy (in progress)
Samurai Champloo
Ichigo 100%
Ghost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex
Ghost in the Shell 2nd Gig
.Hack/Sign
Death Note
Read or Die
Haibane Renmei
Ranma 1/2
Kimagure Orange Road
Baccano!
Victorian Romance Emma
Shuffle 1, 2 (aka Shuffle Memories)
Gilgamesh
Azumanga Daioh
The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya 1, 2
Honey and Clover
Gungrave
Gankutsuo (Count of Monte Cristo)
Evangelion
Toward the Terra
Narutaru
Rosario + Vampire
12 Kingdoms
Planetes
Witch Hunter Robin
Chi's Sweet Home
Dogtato-kun
Ocha-Ken
Tokyo Magnitude 8.0
Speed Grapher
Chobits
sCRYed
Yakitate Ja-pan!
Gundam Wing
Darker Than Black
Inuyasha
Air
Gundam Seed (some)
Berserk
Attack on Titan
Soul Eater 1, and that spin off series with N.O.T.
Great Teacher Onizuka
Excel Saga
Lupin III
Lupin III, Woman Called Fujiko
Pumpkin Scissors
Mysterious Girlfriend X
Midori no Hibe
High School of the Dead
Daughter of Twenty Faces
Fairy Tale
Desert Punk
Ah Megami-sama!
Black Jack
Midori no Hibe
Welcome to the NHK
Gallery Fake
Shakugan no Shana
Eureka 7
Tide Line Blue
Grenadier
Windy Tales
Samurai 7
Initial D
King Jing of Bandits
Popotan
Ninja Scroll The Series
Eden of the East
Wolf's Rain
Big O
Astro Boy 2003
Tokyo Underground
Gakko no Kaidan
Denno Coil
Trinity Blood
Weiss Kreuz
Great Teacher Onizuka
Tsukuyomi Moon Phase
Occult Academy
Escaflowne
Full Metal Panic
Gargantia on the Verdurous Planet
Knights of Sidonia
Kamichu
Kill La Kill
Mushishi

MOVIES --

ALL Studio Ghibli films (minus Princes Kaguya and When Marnie Was There)
ALL Satoshi Kon films
Demon City Shinjuku
Ninja Scroll
Voices of a Distant Star
Beyond the Clouds: Place Promised to Us in Our Early Days
5 Centimeters Per Second
Wicked City
Akira
Steamboy
Vampire Hunter D
FMA: Conquerer of Shambalah
UY: Beautiful Dreamer
Golgo 13 - The Professional
Galaxy Express 999 (Bonjour and Adieu)
Neo Tokyo
City Hunter
Armitage III
Kimba The White Lion
Cowboy Bebop Movie
Princess Arete
Animatrix
Ghost in the Shell 1, 2
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children
The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
And... All those damn Evangelion movies
ERASED
One-Punch Man
FLCL

IN PROGRESS --
Space Dandy
Sword Art Online 2
Tokyo Ghoul
Zankyou no Terror
Blood Lad
Rage of Bahamut (Ep. 2 -- debating whether to finish)
Log Horizon (Started Ep. 1, will finish after SAO2)
JoJo's Bizarre Adventure (Episode 1 -- may replace Bahamut)
Stella Women's Academy High School Division Class C3
Parasyte

Some of my favorite shows are Cowboy Bebop, Trigun, the original Full Metal Alchemist, Evangelion, Death Note, Last Exile, Sword Art Online, Ghost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex, Kino's Journey, Gunslinger Girl, Tiger and Bunny, Macross, Welcome to the NHK, Elfen Lied, Melancholy of Suzumiya, Monster, Paranoia Agent...

It's hard to say what's the best, but Cowboy Bebop is still my favorite.... even though it's almost cliche to say that.

As for movies, that's too tough. I am a huge of fan of Satoshi Kon, though. And Miyazaki, obviously.
Class: Warrior
  • Specializations: Templar, then Champion
  • Attribute priority: Strength. Pop a couple points into Dexterity when talents require it. If you've built your healer well, you don't need to get fancy with Constitution and Willpower.
  • Skills: Combat Training and Combat Tactics; don't bother with the rest. Alternate between selecting the two based on what talents you're about to pick up. If you need a talent that requires the next level of Combat Training get that, otherwise, get Combat Tactics.
  • Talents: Concentrate on filling out the tactics load-out described below. Getting to the third tier of the first line of Warrior Talents and all the lines of Weapon and Shield talents should occupy most of your time.

Leveling Priority

Alistair starts with:

  • Talents: Righteous Strike, Powerful, Shield Bash, Shield Pummel, Shield Block, Shield Cover
  • Skills: Expert Combat Training

I then chose the following as I leveled:

  1. Shield Defense (Weapon and Shield, 2nd line, tier 1)
  2. Shield Balance (Weapon and Shield, 2nd line, tier 2)
  3. Shield Wall (Weapon and Shield, 2nd line, tier 3)
  4. Threaten (Warrior, 1st line, tier 2)
  5. Precise Striking (Warrior, 2nd line, tier 1)
  6. Taunt (Warrior, 2nd line, tier 2)
  7. Overpower (Weapon and Shield, 1st line, tier 3)
  8. Bravery (Warrior, 1st line, tier 3)
  9. Shield Tactics (Weapon and Shield, 3rd line, tier 3, needs 20 Dexterity)
  10. Shield Mastery (Weapon and Shield, 3rd line, tier 4, needs 26 Dexterity)
  11. Specialize in Champion to get War Cry
  12. Death Blow (Warrior, 1st line, tier 4)
  13. Shield Expertise (Weapon and Shield, 2nd line, tier 4)
  14. Rally (Champion, tier 2)
  15. Motivate (Champion, tier 3)
  16. Superiority (Champion, tier 4)

This should take you to level 20-ish. Note you don't need Master Combat Training until you get Shield Mastery, so spend your skill points on Combat Tactics to make sure you can use your abilities.

Tactics

As mentioned above, I didn't want to micromanage Alistair, so I used the following to handle pretty much every encounter. Note because of my reliance on a dedicated healer, Alistair does not use any sustainability/survival abilities.

  • Behavior: Aggressive
  1. Self: AnyActivate mode: Threaten
  2. Self: Being attacked by a melee attackActivate mode: Shield Wall
  3. Self: Being attakced by a ranged attackActivate mode: Shield Cover
  4. Enemy: Nearest VisibleUse ability: Shield Pummel
  5. Self: Surrounded by at least two enemiesUse ability: Taunt
  6. Self: Surrounded by at least three enemiesUse ability: War Cry
  7. Enemy: Health >= 75%Use ability: Shield Bash
  8. Enemy: Health < 75%Use ability: Overpower

Equipment

Equipment choice is not particularly difficult, and I've found you don't need to worry about min/maxing to make him effective, so I'm not going to bother with a mostly unnecessary list of exact gear you need to have. Generally:

  • Armor: Equip the heaviest you can find: ultimately, you'll be wearing massive armor. Favor equipment that has stamina regeneration and secondarily, on "tanking" stats like Constitution, Resistances, Armor, etc.
  • Weapons: Sword and board: long swords and the largest shield you can find.




Mine was, the Second J.M. DeMatteis Run in Spectacular Spider-Man, atleast from issues #241 - 254, #256.    Weaving Peter Parker's world, Peter Parker with Mary Jane, Flash Thomspon with Betty Brant, J Jonah Jameson with Marla Madison-Jameson, Ashley Kafka (always a DeMatteis specialty, along with Ravencroft, while it lasted) with John Jameson, even Liz Allen with Foggy Nelson.  
       Spider-Man's world, further developing characters like Chameleon, his relationship with the Kravinoffs, even succeeding in making even the most "loser" ( Spidey even called them one point or another those times!) quite enjoyable, fun, funny, even sympathetic, such as the Grizzly & Gibbon.   Surprise villains gallore!    
        And, of course, Norman Osborn comes back, buying out half the Bugle, much to the threat of Spider-Man, Peter Parker, and J Jonah Jameson!  
 
   Spectacular Spider-Man #241-245: Chameleon, plus "Mad Jack", Kangaroo , Grizzly, Gibbon, Spot, "return of", introduction of Kraven ( revealed to be son, Aloysha, issue #250) 
   #246: "Legion of Losers" Grizzly, Gibbon, Kangaroo, Spot 
   #247: vs. "Mad Jack" Jack O' Lantern 
   #248-250: Man-Wolf, Kraven, Calypso, "Citizen Osborn!" Norman Osborn 
   #251-253: "Son of the Hunter", Kraven, Calypso, with Grizzly, Gibbon, White Rabbit 
   #254: Dr. Angst, Sir, Norman Osborn 
   #256: Grizzly, Gibbon, White Rabbit
Frank Miller's Daredevil, Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams' Batman, Chris Claremont and John Byrne's X-Men, Alan Moore's Swamp Thing, and Walt Simonson's Thor

Flash, Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E.

Ex Machina, Invincible, or Irredeemable

Wolverine (Jason Aaron)
Here is an Article on Marvel Comic Books to reed by khaleesi.

Hey there, friends! People ask me all the time what they should read in the Marvel Universe. I figured this was a question a lot of new comic fans might have, so I’m gonna do my best to put together a little primer.

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  • Book: Er, depends on the context. Can mean a single comic, can also mean the entirety of a title.
  • Trade: a collection of several comic books in one volume, like a graphic novel. Trades usually collect 6 books in a single volume, so Black Widow Volume 1: A Finely Tangled Web is Black Widow #1-6. They’re a way to read and own comics after the weekly (or biweekly or monthly or whatever) paper comics are unavailable.
  • Event: An event in comics is a major storyline that involves multiple, usually separate, titles. Events are big and have lasting repercussions on the entirety of a comic universe. Examples of events are Civil War and the upcoming Secret Wars/”Battleworld” books.
  • Crossover: A crossover in comics is just like a crossover in fanfic; it’s when two separate titles have the same storyline or appear in each other’s books.

Okay, got that down? Awesome! Here’s some suggestions on what you should read based on your favorite character. Well, er, the six main characters, because this got MAD LONG and I can’t even imagine doing everybody else who’s relevant in Ultron. Jesus.

ANYWAY. If your favorite character is…

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  • and you also love Bucky: The Heroic Age will be fun for you, featuring Commander Rogers and Captain Barnes. Try the Avengers run from this era, written by Brian Michael Bendis. The Super Solider run is kinda weird but fun, too, like virtually everything Brubaker wrote. The art in Super Soldier and Secret Avengers during the Heroic Age is significantly better than the art in Brubaker’s previous runs imo.
  • and you want to know why people ship Steve/Tony: friend, read literally any Avengers run where Iron Man and Captain America are on the same team. But if you’re specifically wondering this, it’s time. It’s time for you to read Civil War and cry.
  • You can probably skip: I’m gonna get murdered for this, but Brubaker’s Captain America and Winter Soldier runs are fun to read for understanding the MCU and if you want a more comprehensive understanding of each character’s backstory, and some weird AF arcs like Bucky fighting a bear with pecs in a gulag while shirtless. BUT. The art is so aggressively Jean Claude Van Damme 90s it’s hard to look at (for me). If you hate that style, you’re probably fine Wiki-ing.
image
  • and you just want to read about Natasha: As much as I want Black Widow’s title to be written by a woman, honestly, her current run – written by Nathan Edmonson, with art by Phil Noto – is one of my favorites. The art is stunning and it’s chock full of fun cameos. Highly recommend. Two trades are available pretty much anywhere you can buy graphic novels, because she’s so popular.
  • and you want to understand why people ship Nat/Bucky: Welcome to the world of Ed Brubaker’s Winter Soldier, but be aware that the art is (sometimes) the kind of art where even if you can’t see Natasha’s face, you know exactly where both of her nipples are at all times. Also she spends a lot of this run being kind of a fighting fucktoy and advancing Bucky’s character development. Comics historically have not been written with ladies in mind, y’all. And yet there are a lot of good reasons to adore this comic, and there’s a reason it’s a classic.
  • You can probably skip: Literally anything Greg Rucka worked on. Ugh.
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  • and you want to know what all the fuss is about because Renner’s Clint is kinda eh and you don’t really get why people are so into Clint: All the fuss is about Matt Fraction’s Hawkeye run with art by David Aja, which starts with a trade volume called My Life As A Weapon and also is an excellent introduction to Kate Bishop, who is also Hawkeye. People ADORE Clint largely because of Fraction’s run, honestly; there’s some other good Hawkeye stuff, but this one is the best.
  • and you want to see him make some use of himself as an Avenger: The Avengers West Coast run that started in the 80′s is pretty fun, tbh. There are two volumes of an omnibus of all West Coast Avengers stuff, and also some trade volumes. Plus you get a bunch of Wanda Maximoff!
  • Bonus: If you want something shorter and fun, try Widowmaker. It’s got Clint, Mockingbird, and Black Widow, and the art is pretty. (David Lopez, one of the pencillers, is currently working on Kelly Sue Deconnick’s Captain Marvel title.)
image


and you just want to get your Avengers fix: Avengers Assemble is great for anybody who wants the familiarity of the film characters, but in comic form. It’s funny, fun, and you get an intro to some other characters but it doesn’t feel overwhelming.

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  • and you suspect he has a drinking problem: You’re right, and the arc where he confronts it is pretty damn good. It’s called Demon in a Bottle and it ran in 1979.
  • and you want to know more about Good Guy Tony: I hate to break it to you, but as Tony is one of my fave characters I can tell you this for sure: Tony Stark is a complicated, fucked up, deeply flawed person; he’s an enormous asshole; he’s selfish and egocentric and narcissistic. But also he has a bunch of Good Guy Tony moments. They are most notable, imo, in the Heroic Age immediately following Civil War, when he beats himself up constantly for being a dick. The Stark Resilient arc, written by Matt Fraction, is super duper good, collected in Invincible Iron Man volumes 5 and 6.
  • and the thing he was trying to do with his suit in IM3 was interesting to you, like what even was that: Totally read Extremis. It’s the arc that establishes Iron Man’s modern image.
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  • but you also would like to support a book about a female character: The current Thor title has lady Thor. Dude-Thor makes several appearances. Also, it’s super good.
  • and you want to read more about Thor’s face-off with Thanos: That you can find in Jurgens’ Thor run, starting in Volume 1 and ending just before the events of Civil War.
  • and you want to know how this character came to be: Read Journey Into Mystery, which started as a horror comic and is just as delightful and pulpy as could be expected.

BONUS!

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  • and you’re even reading this section:  READ HOUSE OF M, IT WILL CHANGE YOU, feel free to Google for context everyone does it
  • and you want to see her as an Avenger: Wanda was part of the West Coast Avengers for most of her time as an Avenger; start there. If you’ve already got that down because I also suggested it under Hawkeye, please feel free to read Uncanny Avengers.
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  • A-Force is an upcoming title that will be written by G. Willow Wilson and Maguerite Bennet with art by Jorge Molina, and will feature an all-female Avengers team.
  • Captain America and the Mighty Avengers is fun as HECK and has Sam Wilson as Captain America, so go revel in that.
  • Captain Marvel by Kelly Sue Deconnick; Carol Danvers is a BAMF and there’s a GOTG cameo; several trade volumes are available
  • Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson; yo I love this comic so much words can’t even do it justice; two trades are available with the third coming 6/23
  • Young Avengers by Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillan; this is for you if you’re constantly asking yourself who Kate Bishop is, or want more teen superheroes in your life; there’s an omnibus available and several trades

That’s it! That’s all I got! Remember that there is absolutely no shame in Googling the characters you like to figure out what you want to read, and wiki-ing the rest. Anybody who tells you that you can’t is a dick. Don’t listen to them!!

khaleesi

I also highly recommend Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, easily one of the most funny and entertaining books Marvel has out right now. Also, Howard the Duck is a fun ride so far, for those wondering about him after his cameo at the end of GOTG.
Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, Spider-Gwen, Deadpool, Avengers stuff is generally pretty good, Guardians of the Galaxy
From writers:Stan Lee,J.M. DeMatteis,Roger Stern,Brian Michael Bendis.
JMS (The Other, Happy Birthday, Coming Home, etc). 
Mark Millar's Marvel Knights
Stan Lee (Amazing Fantasy 15, The Final Capter, The Sinister Six, etc.)
Gerry Cownway (the PUNSHER, The Death of Gwen Stacy, Spiderman vs Hulk, etc)
Roger Stern (Nothing can Stop the Juggernaut, the Hobgoblin, THE BLACK SUIT!) 
Jimmy Ownley (Gang War)
 J.M. De Matteis (Kraven's Last Hunt)
Tod McFarlane (THE GODDAMN VENOM, Cosmic Spidey, etc.)

Linkara's Comic Book Recommendations
Booster Gold
BOOSTER GOLD! He protects the past to ensure your future! I would actually recommend two readings before jumping head first into this series. First is Showcase Presents Booster Gold, a black and white reprint of the original Booster Gold series from the 1980s. It's inexpensive and really shows that despite Booster wanting to make a business out of crimefighting, he ISN'T just in it for money and never was, despite what many modern writers like to have him be written as.

The current series basically continues on from the events of 52, which is another thing I highly recommend reading before jumping into this. However, the premise of the current series is basically that Booster Gold travels through time to right wrongs in the timestream.


Secret Six
Holy crap I cannot recommend this series enough. However, if one wants the full backstory, they should first pick up the series that got them together, known as "Villains United." That book was a tie-in to the event Infinite Crisis (itself a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths), but it sets up the main characters of the Secret Six. From there, there was a Secret Six miniseries "Six Degrees of Devastation" that set up some more character bits, but otherwise the main series itself is AWESOME.

It has a strong focus on the characters. What we have here are six B-list villains who have joined together because they honestly have noone else. It's often both heartwarming and sad, yet at other times disturbing. They've dealt with some of the worst, most evil people (not just supervillains - honest-to-god EVIL people) in the world and yet have still come out as likeable and making you want to read more about them. This is, simply put, one of the best damn books I've ever read.


Birds of Prey
On the other side of the villain/hero divide is Birds of Prey, also by Gail Simone. While Chuck Dixon was the first writer on the book during its first run, Gail really made it her own. The basic premise has Barbara Gordon, AKA Oracle, organizing heroes to run missions for her. Her usual agent is Black Canary, who is NOT a psychotic Irish ninja and has instead been trained by some of the best martial artists in the world.

Really you should be able to jump into any issue or trade without needing to know TOO much more, since any backstory is revealed to the readers in the dialogue. After Gail left the book a few years ago to work on Wonder Woman, Sean Mckeever took over and while it still had good elements, it just didn't quite work the same way, but it's still worth checking out if you become a fan. So yeah, either pick up the current ongoing series or check in with some of the back-issues.


Justice Society of America/JSA
Since a new creative direction is starting in the book, I can't say for certain if the ongoing is still worth it, but the back-issues of the series, particularly when it was called "JSA" are definitely worth checking out. They were the world's first superhero team and they fully embrace that legacy, bringing in new versions of old characters, legacy heroes, and just basically work together to face off against all manner of villains.

Green Lantern/Green Lantern Corps.
Several years ago, Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern, went bad - killed the entire Green Lantern Corps., then tried to remake the universe. Twice. Writer Geoff Johns made it his goal to repair that creative error and has built up a massive amount of mythos around the Green Lanterns.

While at times both series can be a little convoluted and event-crazy, both series are definitely worth checking out for a mixture of superhero action as well as space police kind of fun. Start with the trades, though - at any given time, there might be an event or the like happening and you'll be walking into it without any context as to who is what and where.


Justice League of America/JLA
The quality of the Justice League's main book tends to ebb and flow. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it's average. Personally I think it's at its best when it embraces its tagline of "The World's Greatest Superheroes," which is why if there's a place you want to start from, I'd suggest start with a trade collection of "A Midsummer's Nightmare," which in turn leads into the series "JLA" as written by Grant Morrison.

At times, Grant Morrison's work can feel like you're reading something that just skipped two pages, but this stuff is the height of epic, combining multiple storylines at once to raise the stakes for the heroes and truly make it seem like even though they're the most powerful superheroes in the world, they have a true challenge on their hands.

Batman/Superman/Wonder Woman
Because of the natures of these books with often-rotating creative teams, recommending the "Current" run of any of them will inevitably become outdated. As such, here are just some recommendations for runs I recommend you seek out:

-Batman/Detective Comics runs where Dick Grayson initially starts out as Batman. While him currently being Batman is also good, I think the initial energy of when he started is excellent, particularly under Judd Winick or Grant Morrison (though again, the warning for Grant Morrison's book stands - almost every piece of dialogue becomes important in some fashion).
-Superman: I enjoyed Kurt Busiek's run on the book, but of course with a character like Superman your mileage is always going to vary.
-Wonder Woman: I HIGHLY recommend Gail Simone's run on the book, but if you really wanted a look farther back, Greg Rucka's run is full of heart and great mythical action.

Incredible Hercules - The series spun out of Incredible Hulk and I believe it was written by Greg Pak, though don't take my word for it.
Annihilation - Space Adventure stuff - end of the Marvel universe as we know it, but focuses on Marvel's space heroes fending off the oncoming threat.
Nova - Kind of like Green Lantern, but is the follow-up to Annihilation. I really only read the first few issues, where Nova chews out Iron Man for being too busy with the Civil War crap to stop the Annihilation wave. (It has been pointed out that the ongoing series has been canceled, unfortunately)
Thor - The series written by J. Michael Straczynski. I admit I only read a few issues, but I hear the series has continued to be good even after JMS left.
Amazing Spider-Man - At least, the times when it was written by JMS. One More Day notwithstanding, the series up until that point was actually pretty damn good, with Aunt May discovering Peter's identity and changing the nature of their relationship for the better. Sure, there are some flat-out WEIRD things that happen during the run, but they're not necessarily all that bad compared to others.
Astonishing X-Men - Many have recommended Joss Whedon's run on the book as a good place to start for those looking to get into the X-Men.

JLA/Titans: The Technis Imperative
As I've said many times before, this is my favorite comic book ever. I think I've gone over this one in detail quite enough in actual video form, but in case you missed that episode or skipped it, this is my favorite comic book ever. It's a three-issue miniseries that was meant to get the ball rolling on a new Titans series and it succeeded. The basic premise: an alien force grabs hold of the moon and starts kidnapping every member of the Teen Titans that's ever been on the team.

Admittedly, this one might be difficult for new readers, however this is also the book that got me into comics books to begin with. It gives enough history within its pages that you know what's going on without needing to consult wikipedia and it makes you want to read more about the characters instead of simply being confused by them. It is also the book that I hold as the benchmark for comparison to all other "Event" comics.

This one is also difficult to find since it's out of print, but it's worth trying to find it.


Watchmen
Watchmen is another one that I often will compare other comics to, basically because it is considered by many to be the GREATEST COMIC EVER MADE. I don't necessarily agree, but at the very least it's the "Citizen Kane" of comics. As good as the movie was, it could never hope to capture the actual comic and the multitude of themes and events transpiring within it, plus it changed details here and there (not just the squid thing that I harp on a lot).

The premise is basically that in the 30s and 40s, people were inspired by superhero comics to actually try to become crimefighters themselves. By 1985, it's looked at as a forgotten fad and now one, the Comedian, has been murdered. If a local comic book shop or book store DOESN'T have a copy of Watchmen, even if they don't regularly carry graphic novels, you should wonder what the deal is with it.


V for Vendetta
Another Alan Moore story, but this one's a hell of a lit more grim and washed-out than its barely-recognizable movie adaptation (Hugo Weaving as V being the exception in that).

V for Vendetta is a story about fascism vs. anarchy, not any standard left vs. right politics. The characters are rich and complex, with interweaving plots about attempts to grab power among those already among the elite and a man's quest for revenge who could be easily interpreted as either hero or villain for his actions. This story contains a TON of memorable moments, but for me, none is better than a simple line, "Give me a Viking Funeral." Should be easy to find and does not require any previous comic knowledge.


Starman
If you've seen my "Justice League: Cry for Justice" reviews, you should be familiar with the name James Robinson. Robinson is NOT a bad writer and Starman is proof of that. Even I, someone who hates Cry for Justice with every fiber of my being, cannot bring myself to fault him for Cry for Justice that much because of this series.

Starman is the story of Jack Knight, the son of the Golden Age hero Starman. When Starman's old enemy The Mist begins a massive crime spree to destroy his nemesis and everything he olds dear, Jack must reluctantly take up the mantle of Starman to save his father and Opal City. Along the way of Jack Knight's journey as a hero, he gains allies from across the DC Universe, both heroes and villains, and his story has a definitive conclusion that to this day no one has interfered with out of respect to that character and to James Robinson himself for it.

The series is currently collected in the six Starman Omnibus books, which all should be fairly easy to find or order. While it is built HEAVILY on the mythos of the DC Universe, pretty much every character's backstory is explored and given to the readers, so any supplementary reading just enhances the experience. There are the occasional issues, though, that connect to events occurring in the greater universe at the time, like DC's "One Million" event, but again, it's nothing you NEED to know in order to get the point of the story.


Avengers: Forever
I freely admit that I'm more of a DC fan than Marvel. That isn't to say that I'm not a fan of some Marvel things, but I'm just not as into the Marvel Universe as others. However, I had read a long time ago about how Avengers: Forever was supposed to be really good, so on a whim I picked it up... and it is glorious.

The premise is that the Avengers' longtime ally, Rick Jones, has been targeted for elimination by the being known as Immortus. An alliance of other cosmic forces gathers seven members of the Avengers from across its past and future to protect him and discover the greater plot in play to destroy mankind.

Again, this one may be more difficult for newer readers, but as someone with only a passing knowledge of the Avengers, this was still incredibly fun for me. This one may also be a bit harder to find, but it's well worth it.


52
After the events of the DC event book "Infinite Crisis," the world must now continue without Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman within it. The series was released weekly for an entire year and it was glorious, told in real time to that year. What began as a way to fill in the gaps between Infinite Crisis and the DC books at the time which had "jumped ahead one year later," instead evolved into a story about minor characters in the DCU like Steel, Black Adam, Booster Gold, Renee Montoya, and more exploring various corners of the DC Universe.

There's something for everyone here - a story about a supervillain seeking redemption through the rebuilding of his home nation, a cosmic story about three lost heroes trying to find their way back to earth, one man's quest to bring his wife back to life through magic, and, again, much more.

This one should be easy to find and I'm pretty sure is still in print, but it's a story about the DC Universe as a whole, so of course there are going to be references to events transpiring within it and things that have happened before, but I think should be easy enough for newcomers, especially when reading it again and picking up on all the little things that were hinted and foreshadowed from earlier.


Sandman
There's no easy way to define this series. At its core, it's fantasy. The entity known as Dream (AKA Morpheus, AKA the Sandman) has been trapped for 70 years by a sorceror, but now he's gotten free and rebuilds his domain as the weaver and lord of dreams. Throughout the run we meet some heroes of the DC Universe both past and present, but for the most part this is a story that is all its own, since at the time the DC imprint Vertigo wasn't certain of whether it was really a part of the DC Universe or not.

It's got romance, parables, action, and even a sojourn into hell in one of my favorite issues ever, "A Hope in Hell." This one's still in print, too, and it's honestly that good, though the art style may not be to everyone's taste. It has both beauty and horror and both are given their proper exploration.


Crisis on Infinite Earths
One of the first "Event" books from a major comic company and it's also one of the best. In 1985, the DC Universe had A LOT of alternate universes and timelines. For many, it wasn't difficult to follow, but for new readers it was considered a challenge trying to figure out who was from what world. As such, it was decided to bring them to an end in one of the first "event" comics.

A massive wall of anti-matter is traveling through every parallel universe, wiping them out. What's causing it? How will the worlds survive? Starring EVERYBODY that DC owned, it's the very definition of epic, and really the point where modern DC Comics began. It's also still in print, so it shouldn't be difficult to find. It might be a little difficult for new readers since there are a lot of characters in it who are either dead or have changed over the years, but the principle characters like Batman and Superman are there and you'll have fun wanting to know about some of the other heroes highlighted in it.


Secret Wars
"I AM FROM BEYOND! SLAY YOUR ENEMIES AND ALL THAT YOU DESIRE SHALL BE YOURS! NOTHING YOU DREAM OF IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR ME TO ACCOMPLISH!"
Those are the first words of a being known as the Beyonder, who brings forth a large group of heroes and a large group of villains to duke it out on an alien world. It admittedly can be confusing at times and it's VERY action-oriented, but for an event comic it's got a lot of good character moments and it's also the origin of Spider-Man's black costume. It's got enough great twists and turns to keep you interested and just great superhero action. You don't need to know very much about Marvel history to get this one - most of the history or the like is given in-comic.


Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes, Pre-2011 reboot)
Jaime Reyes' story spun-out of the event book Infinite Crisis, wherein he was given a supposedly-mystical scarab that granted him an armored suit. In his solo series, we see him having to learn how to be a hero while exploring the legacy of the two previous Blue Beetles, paying tribute to those characters. Many people didn't give Jaime a fair shot while he was Blue Beetle, but you can still find the trade paperback of the series, which for a while was my absolute favorite book on the market.

My update here is that I gave the first five issues of the 2011 reboot Blue Beetle a shot and, well, I hated them. I felt that everything that made the book so beloved in my eyes (Jaime's open identity with his family and friends, the strong friendship and camraderie not only with said family and friends but with the scarab, the sense of fun and adventure into a world he had never dreamed of being in, the legacy of the Blue Beetle) had been lost, emphasizing action, violence, and a complete misunderstanding of the original book, instead telling a clichéd story of a reluctant hero battling with the armor possessing him. If you're going to pick up a Blue Beetle series, go with the trades that started with "Shellshocked."


Trinity
After the abysmal Countdown, it would've been very easy for the third weekly series from DC to be even worse, but thankfully it wasn't. Taking a cue from 52, the series is self-contained. Instead of a world without Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, this series asks what if ALL THREE of the them were taken out of the world's entire history and creates new heroes and resurrects several formerly dead ones. While at times the artwork isn't anything spectacular, it's a great story in my humble opinion and definitely worth checking out, though it does continue some elements from the next recommendation.


JLA/Avengers
Krona, a powerful scientist seeking to understand the origins of the universe, makes a bet with the Marvel villain called the Grandmaster. Both pit each universe's respective super-team on a scavenger hunt for some of the most powerful items in their universes. The two teams must learn to respect the other and eventually join forces to save all universes from Krona. This one can be confusing for people new to comics, but it was a load of fun for me, especially the ending confrontation when members of both teams' history keep appearing and disappearing to help. Simply put, it's flippin' awesome. Besides, where else will you see Superman wielding Captain America's shield?


Booster Gold
BOOSTER GOLD! He protects the past to ensure your future! I would actually recommend two readings before jumping head first into this series. First is Showcase Presents Booster Gold, a black and white reprint of the original Booster Gold series from the 1980s. It's inexpensive and really shows that despite Booster wanting to make a business out of crimefighting, he ISN'T just in it for money and never was, despite what many modern writers like to have him be written as.

His other series continued on from the events of 52, which is another thing I highly recommend reading before jumping into this (but isn't necessary). However, the premise of that series was basically that Booster Gold traveled through time to right wrongs in the timestream, visiting past events of the DC Universe and stopping people from altering events.


Secret Six
Holy crap I cannot recommend this series enough. However, if one wants the full backstory, they should first pick up the series that got them together, known as "Villains United." That book was a tie-in to the event Infinite Crisis (itself a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths), but it sets up the main characters of the Secret Six. From there, there was a Secret Six miniseries "Six Degrees of Devastation" that set up some more character bits, but otherwise the main series itself is AWESOME.

It has a strong focus on the characters. What we have here are six B-list villains who have joined together because they honestly have noone else. It's often both heartwarming and sad, yet at other times disturbing. They've dealt with some of the worst, most evil people (not just supervillains - honest-to-god EVIL people) in the world and yet have still come out as likeable and making you want to read more about them. This is, simply put, one of the best damn books I've ever read. While the series had to end in a rather rushed fashion because of the 2011 reboot, it still had an ending that felt like it reflected the themes of the book perfectly.


Birds of Prey
On the other side of the villain/hero divide is Birds of Prey, also by Gail Simone. While Chuck Dixon was the first writer on the book during its first run, Gail really made it her own. The basic premise has Barbara Gordon, AKA Oracle, organizing heroes to run missions for her. Her usual agent is Black Canary, who is NOT a psychotic Irish ninja and has instead been trained by some of the best martial artists in the world.

Really you should be able to jump into any issue or trade without needing to know TOO much more, since any backstory is revealed to the readers in the dialogue. After Gail left the book a few years ago to work on Wonder Woman, Sean Mckeever took over and while it still had good elements, it just didn't quite work the same way, but it's still worth checking out if you become a fan. The 2011 reboot series was just BLEH in my mind, but I've heard good things about it.


Justice Society of America/JSA
I want to particularly emphasize the run by James Robinson, David Goyer, and Geoff Johns. The book spun out of events happening in JLA that showed that the original Golden Age characters (and those who inherited their legacy) still had plenty going for them in modern times, creating a VERY enjoyable book that explains all of its backstory when needed while still possessing a diverse amount of characters rooted in so many different origins. All the trades are worth checking out, as well as the follow-up Justice Society of America book that came following Infinite Crisis.


Earth-2
Speaking of the Justice Society, at the time of this post, they are not a part of the rebooted DCU. However, they instead got their own world to play in - a world that has been through a devastating war with Darkseid, but are now coming into modern times with new heroes emerging and slowly forming a new team. I'm currently enjoying it, but time will tell if this one will stand the test of time.


World's Finest
Aaaand spun off from the Earth-2 concept, the daughter of Batman (the Huntress) and the Supergirl of Earth-2 (Power Girl) have found themselves stranded in the rebooted DCU, trying to find a way home. I know many people have objections with the book, mostly relating to Power Girl and her costume and personality, but personally I haven't ha dany big objections to them. Is her personality different? Yes, but not in a way that I have found frustrating as of yet. Plus I actually liked her costume (they fixed some of the issues I had with it from the preliminary pictures of it), but I hear she's getting the classic boob hole costume again, so whatever.


Deadpool
Like so much else, there is no single place to start looking at the Merc with a Mouth. I would strongly advise looking for trades of Cable and Deadpool, where the two Liefeld creations work awesomely together with Cable the straight man and Deadpool being jokey and breaking the fourth wall. Deadpool's current solo series is an hilarious read and I'd recommend starting there with his tie-in issues to the event Secret Invasion. Deadpool Team-Up has him joining forces with a ton of Marvel heroes, even our old pal US-1 (now called US-Ace).
Deadpool's current solo series is an hilarious read and the previous one was awesome, as well.


Green Lantern/Green Lantern Corps.
Several years ago, Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern, went bad - killed the entire Green Lantern Corps., then tried to remake the universe. Twice. Writer Geoff Johns made it his goal to repair that creative error and has built up a massive amount of mythos around the Green Lanterns.

While at times both series can be a little convoluted and event-crazy, both series are definitely worth checking out for a mixture of superhero action as well as space police kind of fun. Start with the trades, though - at any given time, there might be an event or the like happening and you'll be walking into it without any context as to who is what and where. This book is also one of the least affected by the 2011 reboot, so you have plenty of ground you can cover without worrying too much.


Justice League of America/JLA
The quality of the Justice League's main book tends to ebb and flow. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it's average. Personally I think it's at its best when it embraces its tagline of "The World's Greatest Superheroes," which is why if there's a place you want to start from, I'd suggest start with a trade collection of "A Midsummer's Nightmare," which in turn leads into the series "JLA" as written by Grant Morrison.

At times, Grant Morrison's work can feel like you're reading something that just skipped two pages, but this stuff is the height of epic, combining multiple storylines at once to raise the stakes for the heroes and truly make it seem like even though they're the most powerful superheroes in the world, they have a true challenge on their hands. I have not enjoyed the current verison of it at all.

Power Girl
Power Girl is Superman's cousin from a parallel universe. There, done, that's her origin story in a nutshell. She doesn't take crap from anyone and her series is a lot of fun. The initial run of the book is probably at its best, with fun artwork from Amanda Conner and just awesome writing. The current series by Judd Winick is still good and has some superb artwork from Sami Basri. While it's not as good as the initial run, it's still a good book and worth checking out.

Batman/Superman/Wonder Woman
Because of the natures of these books with often-rotating creative teams, recommending the "Current" run of any of them will inevitably become outdated. As such, here are just some recommendations for runs I recommend you seek out:

-Batman/Detective Comics runs where Dick Grayson initially starts out as Batman. While him currently being Batman is also good, I think the initial energy of when he started is excellent, particularly under Judd Winick or Grant Morrison (though again, the warning for Grant Morrison's book stands - almost every piece of dialogue becomes important in some fashion). Another recommendation there would be anything by Scott Snyder. While his "Death of the Family" arc wasn't as good, IMHO, it was still fairly enjoyable for the most part.
-Superman: I enjoyed Kurt Busiek's run on the book, but of course with a character like Superman your mileage is always going to vary.
-Wonder Woman: I HIGHLY recommend Gail Simone's run on the book, but if you really wanted a look farther back, Greg Rucka's run is full of heart and great mythical action.

Red Robin
While I'm not fond of either the name or the costume, Tim Drake (AKA the third Robin)'s run as the solo hero has been very good, starting with his search for the then-dead Bruce Wayne (though he is annoyingly mopey in the early stuff of the current book), it's followed by a great storyline which pits him against Ra's Al'Ghul and the book is currently written by Fabien Nicieza, who many of you may recall I've felt bad about making fun of in my reviews because he's a good writer. And unlike books like Cable: Blood and Metal, these books don't have hideous artwork or ludicrously boring stories.

Teen Titans
The Titans have had a looong history. If you wanted to start in the past, I'd recommend looking into the run written by Marv Wolfman in the 1980s, considered the very best of the book. Beyond that, Devin Grayson's run on the book, with the team as adults helping teach some of the old guard, is my personal favorite run. The current series written by J.T. Krul has been good so far, but it's only been about three or four issues so far. Geoff Johns' run has been liked by many (and is the start of where the current volume of the book began), but for me it was very hit and miss in some of its aspects, but still recommended. I felt it was really starting to get good again with J.T. Krul's run that ended at issue 100 due to the 2011 reboot. The current ongoing is... bleh.


Darkwing Duck
For those of you who enjoyed the original cartoon, this one picked up a few years later after the series and manages to tell just awesome superhero stories while building on the continuity of the show and having an ongoing storyline. It's exciting, humorous, AND dramatic. Just awesome, but sadly ended some time ago, but still worth picking up in trade.


Batgirl
I fear many fans of Cassandra Cain, the previous Batgirl, haven't taken a look at this series because of perceived disservice to that character. As a fan of Cass, I sympathize and agree she has been given the short stick as of late, but Stephanie Brown's run as Batgirl has been very enjoyable, IMHO. Steph takes the role seriously and her own mythos and supporting cast have been built up over the last year to great effect.

While I still object to Barbara Gordon being back in the Batgirl suit after the spectacular work done with Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown in the role, Gail Simone was the only person that could be trusted to make Barbara as Batgirl work again and the book has been phenmonenal, despite a few shakey early issues.


Kingdom Come
An Elseworlds tale set in the future of the DC Universe. Superman retired after it became clear that the people embraced more violent, aggressive, and murderous anti-heroes. However, some years later a group of heroes causes a disaster in Kansas that forces Superman to come back and make things right. However, will he actually help or only make things worse?


Squadron Supreme
While Watchmen is heralded as one of the pioneer works of making superheroes more "adult," Squadron Supreme dealt with more adult issues a year earlier. Basically the Squadron are pastiches of DC characters, but made by Marvel for a story in their books. During a time back in their own world, they attempt to create a utopia by seizing control of the world, forcibly rehabilitating criminals, and ending the world's problems. It seems pretty cut and dry described like that to make them the villains, but honestly the book is about them trying to come to terms with the ideas they're presenting and their slow realization that they have become a totalitarian state. Highly recommended.


Demon Knights
This is one that's currently ongoing in the DC Reboot (or, if it's cancelled by the time you read this, pick it up in trade). A sword-and-sorcery fantasy tale that's set in the medieval times of the DC Universe. Several heroes and villains who existed around that time find themselves united to face off against various threats. It's highly quotable and has great characterization and art.


Shazam and the Monster Society of Evil
A retelling of Captain Marvel's origins as done by Jeff Smith of Bone fame (Bone in the "I have not read" section below). Young Billy Batson gains the power to become a powerful adult known as Captain Marvel to stop an evil being called Mr. Mind. Very fun, highly recommended, and a good book for kids.


Rapunzel's Revenge
Speaking of books for kids, this one's great. The story is a reinterpretation of Rapunzel, wherein she escapes from the tower herself and uses her hair as lassos against the various people after her while also seeking to topple the regime of the evil Queen who pretended to be her mother for so many years.

Captain America - The series as written by Ed Brubaker, which introduced the concept of the Winter Soldier, which fans of the Captain America movie may want to read in preparation for the sequel.

Incredible Hercules - The series spun out of Incredible Hulk and I believe it was written by Greg Pak, though don't take my word for it.

Annihilation - Space Adventure stuff - end of the Marvel universe as we know it, but focuses on Marvel's space heroes fending off the oncoming threat.

Nova - Kind of like Green Lantern, but is the follow-up to Annihilation. I really only read the first few issues, where Nova chews out Iron Man for being too busy with the Civil War crap to stop the Annihilation wave. (It has been pointed out that the ongoing series has been canceled, unfortunately)

Thor - The series written by J. Michael Straczynski. I admit I only read a few issues, but I hear the series has continued to be good even after JMS left.

Amazing Spider-Man - At least, the times when it was written by JMS. One More Day notwithstanding, the series up until that point was actually pretty damn good, with Aunt May discovering Peter's identity and changing the nature of their relationship for the better. Sure, there are some flat-out WEIRD things that happen during the run, but they're not necessarily all that bad compared to others.

Astonishing X-Men - Many have recommended Joss Whedon's run on the book as a good place to start for those looking to get into the X-Men.

Y: The Last Man - A science fiction story set in a future where a disease has killed off all men except one, a man named Yorick. I've only read snippets, but it's very enjoyable and very smartly written, with naturally lots and lots of earth's remaining population reacting differently to how this kind of catastrophe would affect the world.

The Walking Dead - If you've seen the TV series or at least the Longbox of the Damned episode that talks about the first volume, you should know that it's a pretty smartly-written zombie apocalypse story about a group of survivors as they travel across the land seeking shelter from the walking dead.

Fables - A fantasy series by Bill Willingham with, like, a bajillion volumes and still ongoing, if I recall correctly. The basic starting point is that the fairy tale world still exists and all those characters are still in modern times, having to deal with the various magical politics between them.

Bone - I honestly know nothing about Bone, but I have the first trade and I've heard it's really, REALLY damn good. I also hear it's child-friendly, so there's that.
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 169-183 June, 1968
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 111-149 August, 1972
Marvel Premiere Vol. 1 Issues 9-14 July, 1973
Doctor Strange Vol. 2 Issues 1-18 June, 1974
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 153 February, 1976
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 27-30 February, 1978
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 32-33 December, 1978
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 25-31 December, 1978
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 35-37 June, 1979
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 182-199 July, 1979

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 13 December, 1979

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 200-205 January, 1980

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 43 June, 1980

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 206 July, 1980

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 45-52 August, 1980

The Avengers Issue 200 October, 1980
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 46-62 April, 1981
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 54-58 May, 1981

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 3 September, 1981

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 59-61

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 224-227 January, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 229-231 June, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 16 August 31, 1982

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 232-244 September, 1982

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 78-79 May, 1983

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 17 September 6, 1983

The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 245-252 October, 1983

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issue 85 December, 1983
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issues 65-73 June, 1984
Superman Annual Vol. 1 Issue 11 November, 1984
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 267 August, 1985
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 107-110 October, 1985

Nova Girls: Kissing Canvas 1985
Doctor Strange Vol. 1 Issue 75 February, 1986
The Dark Knight Returns February 1986
The Man of Steel (Comic Book) July 10, 1986
Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? September, 1986
The Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 21 June 9, 1987

Action Comics Issue 592 September, 1987

Action Comics Issue 593 October, 1987
Kraven's Last Hunt 31 October, 1987

Hellblazer January 1988

Tank Girl October 1988
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 1-43 November, 1988
Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom: Triumph and Torment July, 1989

The Infinity Gauntlet July, 1991
The Spectacular Spider-Man Issues 178-203 July, 1991
Maus 1991
Youngblood (Comic Book) April 1992
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 2 July, 1992
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 44-54
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 368-370 November, 1992
The Maxx March 1993

Raver (Comic Book) April, 1993
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 3 June, 1993
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 55-67 June, 1993
Spider-Man Vol.1 Issues 37-40 August, 1993
The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 13 September, 1993
The Secret Defenders Issue 9 November, 1993

The Secret Defenders Issue 10 December, 1993

Future Shock (1993 Comic Book) 1993

Marvels(1994 Comic Book) January, 1994

Hellboy March 1994
The Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 389-406 May, 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 14 June, 14 1994
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual Vol. 1 Issue 4 July, 1994
Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Vol. 1 Issues 68-90 August, 1994
Spider-Man: Clone Saga October 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 217 October, 1994
Bimbos in Time (Comic Book) 1994
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue 223 April, 1995
Astro City August, 1995
Spider-Man: The Lost Years Vol.1 Issues 1-4 August, 1995
Untold Tales of Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 1-26 September, 1995
Preacher (Comic Book) 1995

Superman: At Earth's End 1995

Warrior (1996 Comic Book) January 1, 1996

Spider-Man Team-Up Vol. 1 Issue 2 March, 1996

StormWatch Vol. 1 Issues 37-50 July, 1996
Spider-Man: Redemption Vol. 1 September, 1996
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 241-257 December, 1996
Santa the Barbarian 1996

Spider-Man: Hobgoblin Lives Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 January, 1997

Spider-Man: Dead Man's Hand Vol. 1 Issue 1 April, 1997
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issue -1 July, 1997
StormWatch Vol. 2 Issues 0-11 September, 1997

Untold Tales of Spider-Man Strange Encounter Vol. 1 Issue 1 June, 1998
The Spectacular Spider-Man Vol. 1 Issues 259-261 July, 1998

The Authority Vol. 1 Issues 1-12 May 1, 1999

Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. Vol. 1 Issues 0-14 July 1, 1999

Catwoman: Guardian of Gotham August, 1999

The Authority Vol. 1 Issues 13-29 May 1, 2000

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 164-175 September 1, 2000

Spider-Man: Revenge of the Green Goblin Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 October, 2000

Ultimate Spider-Man October, 2000

What's So Funny About Truth, Justice & the American Way? March, 2001

The Flash: Iron Heights August 1, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 176-177 September, 2001

The Flash: Our Worlds at War Vol. 1 Issue 1 October, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issue 178 November, 2001

The Flash Secret Files and Origins Vol. 1 Issue 3 November, 2001

Daredevil Vol. 2 Issues 26-81 December, 2001

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 179-185 December, 2001

Catwoman Vol. 3 Issue 1-37 January, 2002

DC First: Flash/Superman Vol. 1 Issue 1 July, 2002

The Flash Vol. 2 Issues 186-225 July, 2002
Spider-Man: Blue July 1, 2002

Fantastic Four Vol. 3 Issues 60-70 October, 2002

Marville (Comic Book) November, 2002

Gotham Central Vol. 1 Issues 1-40 December, 2002

Invincible (Comic Book) Issues 1-144 January 22, 2003

Persepolis (Comic Book) April 1, 2003
Superman: Red Son June 1, 2003
Runaways Vol. 1 Issues 1-18 July, 2003

Fantastic Four Vol. 1 Issues 500-524 September, 2003

Spider-Man/Doctor Octopus: Negative Exposure Issues 1-5 December 1, 2003
Superman: Secret Identity January 1, 2004
Marvel Knights: Spider-Man Vol. Issues 1-12 June, 2004
Ex Machina (Comic Book) Issues 1-50 August 1, 2004

Scott Pilgrim August 18, 2004

The Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 500-503 September, 2004

Madrox Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 November, 2004

Witchblade Vol. 1 Issues 80-150 November, 2004

The Avengers Vol. 1 Finale Issue 1 December 1, 2004

The New Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-15 December 29, 2004

WE3 2004

Silent Hill: Paint It Black February, 2005

Runaways Vol. 2 Issues 1-24 April, 2005

All Star Batman & Robin, the Boy Wonder July, 2005
The World's Greatest Super-Heroes July 6, 2005
All-Star Superman November, 2005

Annihilation (Comic Book) November, 2005

The Future 5 2005

Jonah Hex Vol. 2 Issue 1-70 January, 2006

X-Factor Vol. 3 Issues 1-31 January, 2006

The Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 Issues 92-111 April 2006

The New Avengers Annual Vol. 1 Issues 1-2 April 26, 2006

The New Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 16-64 April, 2006

Detective Comics Vol. 1 Issues 821-850 September, 2006

X-Men Vol. 2 Issues 188-207 September, 2006

The Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1 Issues 1-12 November 29, 2006
Doctor Strange: The Oath Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 December 1, 2006

Thunderbolts Vol. 1 Issues 110-121 January 31, 2007

The Mighty Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-20 March 7, 2007

Countdown to Final Crisis May, 2007
The Sensational Spider-Man Annual Vol.1 Issue 1 May 2, 2007

The Invincible Iron Man Vol. 1 Issues 1-33 May 8, 2007

Runaways Vol. 2 Issues 25-30 June, 2007

World War Hulk Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 June 13, 2007

Annihilation: Conquest - Starlord Vol. 1 Issues 1-4 September, 2007

Spider-Man: One More Day November, 2007

The Incredible Hercules Vol. 1 Issues 112-141 January, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist: Orson Randall and the Green Mist of Death Vol. 1 Issue 1 February 1, 2008

Locke & Key: WeLCoMe To LoVeCRaFT Issues 1-6 February 20, 2008

X-Men: Legacy Vol. 1 Issues 208-260 April, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1 Issues 13-16 May, 2008

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Issues 1-25 July, 2008

X-Factor: The Quick and the Dead July, 2008

The Immortal Iron Fist: The Origin of Danny Rand Vol. 1 Issue 1 August, 2008

X-Factor Vol. 3 Issues 32-50 August, 2008

Runaways Vol. 3 Issues 1-14 October, 2008

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 34-45 October, 2008

Final Crisis: Rogues' Revenge Vol. 1 Issues 1-3 September 1, 2008

Irredeemable Issues 1-37 April 1, 2009

The Flash: Rebirth Vol. 1 Issues 1-6 April 1, 2009

Justice League: Cry for Justice July 1, 2009

Fantastic Four Vol. 1 Issues 570-611 August 26, 2009

The Incredible Hulk Vol. 1 Issues 601-611 August 26, 2009

Supergirl Annual Vol. 5 Issue 1 November, 2009

Thunderbolts Vol. 1 Issues 138-174 November 18, 2009

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 46-57 December, 2009

X-Factor Vol. 1 Issues 200-262 December 16, 2009

American Vampire March 17, 2010

The Flash: Secret Files and Origins Vol. 1 Issue 1 April 7, 2010

The Flash Vol. 3 Issues 1-12 April 14, 2010

Artifacts (Comic Book) Issues 1-32 May 1, 2010

The New Avengers Finale Vol. 1 May 12, 2010

The Avengers Vol. 4 Issues 1-20 May 19, 2010

Avengers Academy June 2010

Avengers Prime Vol. 1 Issues 1-5 June 3, 2010

Jonah Hex: No Way Back June 3, 2010

The New Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 1-15 June 16, 2010

The Invincible Iron Man Annual Vol. 1 Issue 1 June 30, 2010

Thor: The Mighty Avenger Vol. 1 Issues 1-8 July 8, 2010

Uncanny X-Force Vol. 1 Issues 1-35 October, 2010

Supergirl Annual Vol. 5 Issue 2 December, 2010

Detective Comics Vol. 1 Issues 871-881 January, 2011

Supergirl Vol. 5 Issues 58-59 January, 2011

The Invincible Iron Man Vol. 1 Issues 500-527 January 19, 2011

FF Vol. 1 Issues 1-23 March 23, 2011

Flashpoint Vol. 2 Issues 1-5 May 11, 2011

The New Avengers Annual Vol. 2 Issue 1 September 7, 2011

The New Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 16-34 September 14, 2011

Holy Terror (Comic Book) September 28, 2011

Fear Itself Vol. 1 Issue 7.2 November 9, 2011

Fear Itself Vol. 1 Issue 7.3 November 16, 2011

The Avengers Annual Vol. 4 Issue 1 January 4, 2012

The Avengers Vol. 4 Issues 21-34 January 18, 2012

Saga (Comic Book) March 2012 

Avengers Assemble Vol. 2 Issues 1-8 March 14, 2012

The Culling: Rise of the Ravagers (Comic Book) July, 2012

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 1-19 October 10, 2012

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Issues 1-21 March 27, 2013

Artifacts (2010 Comic Book) Issues 33-40 December 31, 2013

Southern Bastards April 30, 2014
Uncanny Avengers Annual Vol. Issue 1 April 30, 2014

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 1 Issues 20-25 May 28, 2014

Avengers & X-Men: AXIS Vol. 1 Issues 1-9 October 8, 2014

Guardians of the Galaxy Annual Vol. 3 Issue 1 December 10, 2014

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Issues 22-27 December 17, 2014

Uncanny Avengers Vol. 2 Issues 1-5 January 28, 2015

Guardians of Knowhere Vol. 1 Issues 1-4 July 15, 2015
 ‎

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NightSlash123
Nightslash
Artist | Student | Varied
United States
I just here to post some of my art.

Sonata Arctica. Stratovarius. Van Canto.
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Top 10 X-Men Characters: 10-Juggernaut 9-Beast 8-Cyclops 7-Deadpool 6-Jean Grey 5-Sabretooth 4-Magneto 3-Gambit 2-Rogue 1-Wolverine





Favourite genre of music: Rock.

Favourite style of art: any.



Cosplayers I like: :iconyayacosplay: :iconbunnyayumi: :iconriddle1: :icongiuzzys: :icongrellkaloli: :iconhikaru-jan: :iconvandorwolf: :iconnadyasonika: :iconmostflogged:

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║╚╣║║║║╩╣ MUSIC!!!!!!!!!!!
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Skillet
Renard
cage the elephant
Evanescence
Radio head
pixies
Skrillex
Gorillaz
Mindless self Indulgence
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:iconnemangawolf:
NeMangaWolf Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2014  Student General Artist
Thanks so much for the fav :heart:
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:iconasinglepetal:
ASinglePetal Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Professional Digital Artist

Thank you for the fave!

My commissions are open for Urgent!

On my profile

Here is tumblr :I

asinglepetal.tumblr.com/

Ask blog askcrysta.tumblr.com/

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:iconguason0411:
guason0411 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2014   Traditional Artist
Thanks for the fav!!
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:iconkarkats-spaghetti:
Karkats-Spaghetti Featured By Owner May 3, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
H'why thankyah for ze fave :iconfeellikeasirplz:
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:iconnauticalsparrow:
NauticalSparrow Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
:iconiloveitplz::icondevwatchplz:
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:iconphillip-the-2:
Phillip-the-2 Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Domo for all +fav on Maddie Fenton by Phillip-the-2
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:iconphillip-the-2:
Phillip-the-2 Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Domo for all :+fav: on Bonding Moment by Phillip-the-2
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:icongumnutbunny:
GumNutBunny Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2014   General Artist
thank-you for the watch :3
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:icondallony:
Dallony Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the :+fav: <3
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:iconck-draws-stuff:
CK-Draws-Stuff Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Thanks for watching me.
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